Your Good Life Guide to the Hudson Valley. It's Fun Here!
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Helping Kids Remember the True Meaning of Easter

easter timeInstead of chocolate bunnies and egg hunts, shift Easter’s focus to faith and rebirth.

By Kathryn Slattery

Jelly beans, cellophane-covered baskets, giant candy bunnies. As I spotted all the trappings of Easter in the supermarket, I thought to myself, No wonder kids get confused about Easter.

Explaining Christmas was a cinch–the birth of Christ is simpler to grasp. Creches, carols and pageants all reinforce the message, making it easier to keep Santa Claus in perspective. But how could I explain to my two school-age children something as profound and mysterious as the Resurrection?

I knew that other parents were struggling with this, too. In fact, I took the greatest comfort in the advice of one friend who said, “Start with the traditions you already have.”

On Good Friday in our home we always color Easter eggs–three dozen. What could be a more obvious symbol of new life than eggs? Last year I told the children about a chick I once saw hatching in an incubator. I described how he poked his way out with his beak. “A new life. That’s what we celebrate at Easter,” I explained, “the new life we have in Christ.”

The next bit of inspiration came while I was shopping. I found a set of Bible storybooks for my son, Brinck, and came across a tiny gold cross necklace for Katy. I included these presents in the children’s Easter baskets, and since then I’ve added prayer journals, tapes, Scripture stickers and bookmarks. I like the tradition of Easter baskets, especially when I can include gifts that will nurture the children’s faith.

The third idea came from Guideposts contributor Posy Baker Lough. “Try something,” she suggested, “to give children a good visual image of the Resurrection.” She described a project at her church: The children were given caterpillars, and in the weeks prior to Easter the kids watched them spin cocoons, metamorphosing into butterflies.

“The butterflies were released just before Easter Sunday service,” Posy said. “Afterward, when we explained to the kids that the cocoon was like Christ’s death and entombment, and that his resurrection was like the butterfly, they understood.”

At Easter time, images of new life are usually easy to find: crocuses and daffodils blooming, lambs gamboling in fields, birds returning to their nests, green returning to the landscape. But sometimes spring comes late (or Easter comes early) and the holiday meets a gray, cold day. Then I think of something that happened to my friend Alison.

On an unseasonably cold Easter morning when Alison was 10 years old, her mother urged her to go outside to see what was in the yard. There in the snow her mother had made a rainbow of hundreds of brightly colored lollipops, sparkling like bits of stained glass. “It seemed like a miracle,” Alison says. “Magical, beautiful, full of mystery and wonder.”

And that, I realize, is what I want more than anything else to give my children: the miracle of Easter. It was God’s most astonishing miracle, the resurrection of Christ and the promise it held for us: eternal life.

So, finally, go to church on Easter. Put on your best clothes, take flowers from your garden, sing all the hymns with alleluias. Celebrate. Last Easter Sunday I was delighted when I overheard one youngster say, “Christmas is Jesus’ birthday, but Easter is everybody’s birthday.”

Yes, it is. Easter is the time for you and your children–for all of us–to joyfully celebrate our new birth.

 

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Is Your Child Ready for a Cell Phone?

kids cell phoneConsider the fine print before you let your child go mobile.

By Susan Davis

No doubt about it: Cell phones are a great way to stay in touch anytime, anywhere. But is your child old enough to have one? It’s a tough call for many parents because it’s not just about age.

Benefits

You can’t beat the convenience. If your child has a cell phone, you can call or text him to find out where he is and what he’s doing and inform him of your own plans. It can make you feel safer just knowing  where your kids are. And in an emergency, a cell phone can be crucial if your child needs to reach you — or vice versa.

That’s partly why many parents are buying their kids cell phones. Twice as many children have cell phones now as in 2004. Most teens — 85% of those aged 14 to 17 — have cell phones. So do 69% of 11-14 year olds and 31% of kids aged 8-10, according to a 2010 survey by the Kaiser Family Foundation.

Risks

Health considerations, sleep (or lack thereof), teen drivers and texting are all risks that concern many parents. Talk to your teen about the risks. Follow up over time to make sure he or she gets the message.

Above all, set a good example. If they see you texting (or talking) while driving, you’ve undermined the lesson you want them to learn.

When Are They Ready?

As your child becomes more independent (think middle schoolers or high schoolers), they’re closer to needing a phone than younger children whom you still take everywhere. Look for the developmental signs, does your child lose his belongings? Is he generally a responsible kid? Can you trust him? Will he understand how to use the phone safely? The rate at which kids mature varies — it will even be different among siblings.

You are your child’s No. 1 role model, whether your child admits it or not. Teach good behavior: Children aren’t born knowing the rules about how to use cell phones respectfully, including not using them to spread rumors, not taking (or sending) photos without people’s permission, not sending inappropriate photos or texts, not having personal conversations in public places – and, of course, never communicating with strangers, no matter how they present themselves. It’s up to you to teach them.